Scienceweb

By Lois Francis

Photo:The building of the Stroudwater is a rich context for learning in science.

The building of the Stroudwater is a rich context for learning in science.

Lois Francis

The many photos of the structures along the Stroudwater Canal can be the impetus for learning about forces and materials. 

  • The floor of the locks along the canal have inverted arches built in brick to ensure that the walls of the locks did not fall in. 
  • The gates are finely balanced about pivots to aid opening.
  • The typical shape of the Stroudwater bridges is an arch with a key stone holding the arch together. ( see Ryeford, Westfield, Occupation Bridge- Whitminster and Nutshell Bridge- Stonehouse).
  • Ryeford Lock has three 'porthole' structures in the lock to allow water to be released from the material behind the lock wall. It was a notorious lock for falling in because water would build up behind the wall and push the wall out.
  • Many bricks were rejected because they were either too brittle( baked too long) or too porous.
  • By looking at the painting of Stroud and observing the 'trows' being man-hauled along the canal, children can ask the question- 'how can a man haul a boat loaded with cargo?' so initiating activities connected with 'upthrust'.
This page was added by Lois Francis on 20/07/2012.

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